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20130104
20130112
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floor for days reading phone books to fight a civil rights being voted on. why don't they force these guys go on c-span and read the phone book. >> there is a fourth and a fifth. they let this game get out of hand in the first term. don't upset them because maybe we can deal with them. don't upset the right wing crazy--it hasn't worked. the press has dropped the ball. they will not explain what the entire filibuster culture is, and there is no price to pay for being radically obstructionist. >> john: that's why i read your column. thank you for being here this evening. >>> it's time to be here when were you players enter the baseball hall of fame which makes it a proud day for--nobody. that's it. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> john: for the first time since 1996, the baseball writers of america did not elect anyone to be inducted into the baseball hall of fame. this despite the fact that to of the best players of the last 30 years were on the ballot. roger clemens and barry bonds. a seven-time mvp, the only player in major league history to hit over 500 home runs, bonds is the all-t
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3